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PerfSCAN technology lets you make informed, better completion decisions that ensure good fluid distribution, resulting in comparably sized fractures.

How does this all work?

PerfSCAN technology is based on a pressure-based fracture map computed using our patented data acquisition and processing. The data source is a surface pressure gauge on a monitor well – established through isolation from prior stages – that records the poroelastic pressure response from a nearby treatment well during hydraulic fracturing. As the treatment well is fracked, our geoscientists and completion engineers identify and quantify the poroelastic signals from the monitor well’s measured pressure response.

We use the poroelastic signals to compute a simple, accurate, affordable pressure-based fracture map by matching the observed responses in the monitor well to a digital twin. The fracture map includes fracture half-length, height, asymmetry, and azimuth and how fast these dimensions grew.

With the map and PerfSCAN technology, we can determine good cluster efficiency to optimze fracture growth by distributing the fluid into most if not all of the clusters along the stage. Poor cluster efficiency causes a few clusters to take most of the fluid, resulting in fracture growth of the largest fracture to continue over most of the treatment duration.

With this information, you can rapidly identify completion factors, such as the cluster design, diversion design, pumping rate, and fluid type that, combined, will distribute fluid equally among multiple perforation clusters in a single stage.

Case study: Not a shot in the dark

Does the lithology or fracking sequence have an affect on the fluid distribution on a multicluster stage? Does fracking the outside stages create better fluid distribution in the internal stages?

PerfSCAN technology is based on a pressure-based fracture map computed using our patented data acquisition and processing. The data source is a surface pressure gauge on a monitor well – established through isolation from prior stages – that records the poroelastic pressure response from a nearby treatment well during hydraulic fracturing. As the treatment well is fracked, our geoscientists and completion engineers identify and quantify the poroelastic signals from the monitor well’s measured pressure response.

We use the poroelastic signals to compute a simple, accurate, affordable pressure-based fracture map by matching the observed responses in the monitor well to a digital twin. The fracture map includes fracture half-length, height, asymmetry, and azimuth and how fast these dimensions grew.

With the map and PerfSCAN technology, we can determine good cluster efficiency to optimze fracture growth by distributing the fluid into most if not all of the clusters along the stage. Poor cluster efficiency causes a few clusters to take most of the fluid, resulting in fracture growth of the largest fracture to continue over most of the treatment duration.

With this information, you can rapidly identify completion factors, such as the cluster design, diversion design, pumping rate, and fluid type that, combined, will distribute fluid equally among multiple perforation clusters in a single stage.